Book Review: Girl Online

girl online cover

Sugg, Zoe. Girl Online. Keywords Press, Atria. 2014.

As an adult, I like to pretend that I was never an awkward pre-teen or teenager. The proof is inescapable, however. My mother recently found an old photo from a glamour shot session–sequined blazer, big hair, and too much rouge.

So, in short, I know a little something about being awkward.

That’s why I found the synopsis of Zoe Sugg’s Girl Online appealing. The protagonist is clumsy, unsure, and very relatable.

Fifteen-year-old Penny Porter seems to continually find new ways to embarrass herself, whether it’s falling in a pothole, knocking over a display, or inadvertently telling the boy she likes that she has fleas. And there’s an alarming new development in Penny’s life–following a serious car accident, Penny has panic attacks. Her only moments of true peace and security come from being with her family, best friend Elliot, and sharing her thoughts in a blog entitled Girl Online. Despite her lackluster popularity in the “real world”, Penny has a slew of readers who encourage and uplift her.

After a particularly painful incident at Penny’s school, her parents make an announcement–they will be traveling abroad to New York City to help coordinate a wedding at the Waldorf Astoria and they want Penny and Elliot to come along. The distance and glamour of New York are just what Penny needs to heal from her embarrassment. While helping her mother with wedding preparations, Penny meets Noah, the grandson of the wedding’s caterer. With his dimples, Brooklyn accent, and ability to calm her when she is anxious, Penny begins falling for Noah almost immediately. But she knows that soon she will have to return home to the UK. Will she and Noah be able to maintain a long-distance relationship? Why does Noah rarely go out in public? And as the popularity of Girl Online grows, will Penny be able to keep her identity a secret?

There were great little details and moments of humor that endeared this book to me–Sugg’s descriptions of New York at Christmastime, the contrast between UK and America, and Penny’s tendency to say the wrong thing in times of duress. Although relationships in YA romances sometimes feel forced, Noah and Penny’s chemistry was palpable and believable. Blog posts and text messages are interspersed throughout the chapters, and they provide a nice break from the narration. Overall, Girl Online is a quick, enjoyable read.

I felt the immense popularity of Penny’s blog was somewhat far-fetched; the insertion of more blog posts would have possibly helped the reader see what made it attractive to so many readers. And Megan, Penny’s “frienemy”, was so thoroughly evil that she felt flat.

This will be a beloved addition to a classroom library–not only is it a high interest text, but the author, Zoella, is a popular vlogger on YouTube. More importantly, this book could possibly provide comfort to students struggling with their own anxiety. Girl Online is a nice reminder that the teenage years can be awkward, but they can be amazing, too.

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