Book Review: Truthers

truthers cover

Girard, Geoffrey. Truthers. Carolrhoda Lab, 2017.

I should preface this review by admitting that I’m not fond of 9/11 conspiracy theories. I usually find them far-fetched, so much so that I initially resisted reading Geoffrey Girard’s Truthers despite the many Instagram posts and glowing reviews I found online. I was then able to meet Girard at the Books by the Banks Festival in Cincinnati. Not only was he friendly and personable, but I also learned that he was a fellow teacher. This latter bit of information persuaded me to give Truthers a try.

Sixteen-year-old Katie Wallace has spent much of her adolescence caring for her mentally ill and drug addicted father. When police and a social worker inform Katie that her father has been placed in a psychiatric hospital, she isn’t surprised. During her first visit with him, Katie’s father shares shocking information—he claims that Katie isn’t his biological daughter, and, even more staggering, her mother was a victim of a government orchestrated 9/11. He claims he took Katie from her mother’s arms before officials sent plane passengers to their certain death.

His claims spur Katie to frantically seek the help of an attorney. A high-profile lawyer says she’ll take Katie’s case if she’s able to prove that some of her father’s radical ideas have merit. What follows is a spiral of researching and investigating, leading Katie to uncover facts and coverups that surprise her. Amid her research, she meets teen prodigy Max, who challenges many of the theories while providing his hacking expertise. But Katie can’t shake the feeling that she’s wading into dangerous territory. Is she being watched? Will her actions have repercussions? Will she find the right information to free her father? Where is her biological mother?

Girard’s prose is masterful and suspenseful. From the beginning of the Truthers to the end, I felt a growing paranoia for Katie and many of the other characters in the novel. I was truly invested in the mystery at the core of Truthers, and my determination to uncover the next big plot twist kept me up late at night. Girard has obviously done his research as evidenced by the inclusion of many court cases, theories, and timelines; there’s even a works cited page at the book’s end.

Along the same vein, the abundance of information is perhaps the book’s weakest attribute. There are moments the text feels dense with figures, facts, names, and events. I would assume that teen readers, largely unfamiliar with some of the specifics of 9/11, might find themselves overwhelmed.

Most students are interested in conspiracy theories, so I could predict that Truthers would be a popular choice in a classroom library. No matter your feelings on the Truther movement, Katie’s end goal is admirable and involves something we ask our students to do every day—to back up claims with evidence.

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