Book Review: Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index

Juniper Lemon Cover

Israel, Julie. Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index. Kathy Dawson Books, 2017.

I select books in many different ways. I heed recommendations from my co-workers and students, pay attention to the covers I see on my Instagram feed, and check out the new releases from authors I’ve enjoyed in the past.

Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index is perhaps the first book I’ve selected based on its title alone. I was immediately curious—what kind of name was Juniper Lemon? What was a happiness index? I was excited to receive the book for Christmas so I could begin reading and find out.

Juniper, a high school junior, is grappling with life following the abrupt and tragic death of her older sister Camilla. There are holes everywhere Juniper looks: her parents are quiet shells of their former selves and teachers and adults are awkward and bumbling in her presence. Perhaps most devastating, Juniper’s former best friend, Lauren, has drifted away simply because she doesn’t know how to handle Juniper’s grief. Juniper carries on a tradition that Camilla instituted—a daily “happiness index”. On an index card, she writes the positives and negatives from that day, with an overall rating from one to ten. Since Camilla’s passing, most of these ratings have been dismal. But a discovery gives Juniper a renewed sense of purpose. She finds a handwritten break up letter from Camilla to a mysteriously addressed “YOU”. Juniper is puzzled—to her knowledge, Camilla wasn’t seeing anyone at the time of her death.

As Juniper attempts to untangle the mystery of the breakup letter, she also must begin her friend circle anew. More discoveries lead to her befriending the often-bullied Kody and the dreamy Angela. A new student, Nate, also strikes up a friendship, though Juniper struggles to understand his motives. Most surprising, Juniper finds herself enjoying the company of Brand, the resident school bad boy who spends most of his time in detention or vandalizing property. With the help of her new friends, will Juniper be able to find the “YOU” her sister was addressing? Will the resolution of this mystery alleviate her grief? Will she find a way to heal her family and keep Camilla’s memory alive?

I found this novel particularly poignant in its portrayal of grief. Anyone who has ever suffered a deep personal loss will likely agree that Juniper’s account is painfully accurate. The most heart-wrenching moments were unintentional—for example, a teacher starts to ask if Juniper is Camilla’s sister before remembering Camilla’s death and awkwardly stopping herself. The characterization of Juniper and Brand Sayers was particularly strong. Juniper is vulnerable, devastated, but darkly funny. Brand is perhaps the most pleasant surprise of the entire novel, a layered character who carries his own share of sadness.

In a largely perfect novel, I only wish that two of the characters—Nate and Morgan—were given detailed characterization as well. Nate is important, but his role in the book nearly diminishes as the story unfolds. And Morgan, the resident school bully, is thoroughly mean and flat. She even pokes fun at Camilla’s death, a taunt that is overheard by adults who do not intervene.

Overall, Juniper Lemon’s Happiness Index is well-written and gritty and sure to be loved by teenage readers. As silly as it may sound, I thought the book could perhaps aid students in journaling. I loved how Juniper kept track of each day and rated them accordingly. This could perhaps inspire students to create indexes of their own and write about the highlights and disappointments of their day-to-day life.

Book Review: All Rights Reserved

All Rights Reserved Cover

Katsoulis, Gregory Scott. All Rights Reserved. Harlequin Teen, 2017.

When teaching poetry, my students and I pause and discuss our favorite (school appropriate) words. There doesn’t have to be a deep, philosophical reason behind the favoriting of a word—perhaps it’s simply fun to say. Some of my favorite words include umbrella, melancholy, and cacophony.

If I lived in the dystopian world of All Rights Reserved, I would likely pay a hefty sum of money for using any of my favorite words.

Speth Jime lives in a world tightly controlled by greedy corporations, litigation happy lawyers, and stringent copyright laws. In Speth’s society, citizens receive a cuff they must wear around their wrist from their fifteenth birthday onward. The cuff records the words they speak and the gestures they make and charges the wearer appropriately. The phrase “find me”, for example, costs over eleven dollars. Citizens are also charged for hugging, holding hands, nodding, and kissing. Corporations own every word and gesture, and debt is seemingly unavoidable. Most teens live alone as their parents enter indentured servitude to pay the money they owe.

On Speth’s fifteenth birthday, her friend Beecher commits suicide moments before Speth is due to give her first speech and plug various sponsors. His actions convince Speth to keep silent and not engage in any gestures or actions that would cost money. Speth’s guardian, friends, and siblings are shocked—Speth will be unable to work or purchase goods if she chooses not to speak. This is further complicated when Speth’s older sister and the family’s bread winner, Saretha, is barred from working outside the home. As Speth strategizes various ways to save her family, she notices a growing movement of “Silents”—fellow adolescents who have chosen not to speak. Will Speth be blamed for their disobedience? Will she find a way to keep her family afloat? Will she be able to maintain her silence?

In a genre saturated with dystopian books, All Rights Reserved manages to stand out as a unique read. I was drawn into Speth’s world immediately, as the various nuances and rules seem eerily similar to today’s world. For example, Speth cannot ring her friend’s doorbell as she would be required to watch and react to an ad beforehand. This reminded me a great deal of watching an ad before a YouTube video or logging onto a website and dealing with many pop up ads. And, as an English teacher, I couldn’t help but smile at the references to classic dystopias sprinkled throughout the novel—Ayn Rand and 1984 are both subtly incorporated.

I had few complaints about Katsoulis’ novel—it was engaging and fast-paced. There were moments, though, where I hungered for more detail and explanation. Some areas of Speth’s world—the park at the book’s opening, for example—seemed to lack sensory detail. And some characters were briefly touched on, then forgotten. I was particularly captivated by Speth’s rebellious teacher, Mrs. Soleman, who is given a pivotal scene and then never mentioned again.

I plan to recommend All Rights Reserved to my students as we prepare for our upcoming dystopian literature circles. Even if you don’t teach dystopia, there are plenty of reasons to include All Rights Reserved in your classroom library or curriculum. The novel can start great conversations about rhetorical devices and advertising techniques—how do advertisers attempt to manipulate Speth and other citizens? How do advertisers manipulate us today? Students will come away from the novel with a greater appreciation for words and our ability to communicate freely, which is an extremely positive side effect.