Book Review: Warcross

warcross

Lu, Marie. Warcross. Penguin Books, 2017.

I spent the bulk of my undergraduate career reading, but not reading for fun. I instead poured through classics or textbooks or articles about effective teaching practices. So, when I finally had time for leisurely reading, I chose Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games. I can remember my fascination with this new world, and how my heart soared and broke for Katniss Everdeen. I read at such a feverish pace that I had the trilogy completed in a few days. My love for YA fiction began with those books.

Perhaps that’s why I found Marie Lu’s Warcross such a pleasurable read. Emika Chen reminds me a great deal of Katniss, and the nonchalance found among the citizens in Warcross reminded me of the ignorance in Panem.

Emika Chen is left penniless following the death of her sole caretaker, her father. A doting man and a creative fashion designer, Emika’s father had a dark secret: a copious amount of online gambling debt. Left to her own devices and sporting a spotty criminal record, Emika turns to bounty hunting to survive. Thanks to a new technology sweeping the world—a virtual reality that exists just by putting on a pair of glasses—Emika is alerted when the police need extra assistance. Still, Emika is down to thirteen dollars, and she, too, finds an escape in virtual reality and an online game known as Warcross. Emika is watching the Warcross Championships when her desperation reaches a fever pitch. She attempts to hack into the game and steal a valuable power-up to resell. This unintentionally glitches her into the game, bringing the festivities to a halt.

Afterward, Emika is panicked, believing she will be arrested or sued. To her surprise, the creator of Warcross, Hideo Tanaka, pays off her debts and requests her presence in Tokyo. He tells Emika that a hacker with malevolent intentions is attempting to disrupt Warcross. He needs her help identifying and capturing the hacker, and believes her participation in Warcross as a wild card will provide an inconspicuous and convenient disguise. The payment for capturing the hacker is monumental—ten million dollars. Will Emika find success as a Wacross player? Will she be able to reveal the identity of the hacker? Will she learn more about the mysterious Hideo Tanaka?

Marie Lu is an expert in sensory detail. Every facet of Emika’s world is described in a detailed way—from Emika’s rainbow streaked hair to the brightly colored power-ups in Warcross to the seedy underbelly of the Dark Web. The descriptions of Warcross and the various, ever changing worlds where the game takes place were absolutely captivating. And the book maintains the suspense throughout; Emika, and the reader, is never sure who to trust.

As someone who teaches and loves dystopia, I was a little disappointed that Warcross doesn’t make a lot of social commentary. There’s very little information about the government that exists in Emika’s world as well as what hardships in the “real world” have driven so many to seek an escape in virtual reality. I do believe the book is likely the beginning of a series, so perhaps this will be addressed in a sequel.

Overall, Warcross is an immersive, beautifully-written novel that will hold your attention from the first page to the last. Students will likely be attracted to the colorful cover and the action found within. Those who teach technology or coding will find it a useful addition to their curriculum. The novel will spur teens and adults alike to meditate on their own values and beliefs, as well as their personal definition of right and wrong.

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