Book Review: The Hazel Wood

thehazelwood

Albert, Melissa. The Hazel Wood. Flat Iron Books, 2018.

Note: This is a review of an advanced reading copy.

I was fortunate to receive an ARC of Melissa Albert’s The Hazel Wood. I’ve received other books in the past; however, upon opening the package, I knew Albert’s novel was unique. The cover was beautiful, embossed with silver and gold images of daggers and castles and birdcages. It was covered with blurbs of praise from authors such as Stephanie Garber and Kristin Cashore. And now, having read the novel, I can say with certainty that “unique” was an understatement. The Hazel Wood will be a sensation very soon, and with good reason.

At only seventeen, Alice has lived the chaotic life of a wanderer. She and her mother have never settled in one place, moving from one state to the next. Once in a new home, they relax briefly before being plagued by bad luck and moving again. In fact, Alice’s earliest memories consist of long stretches of highway and the books she read during her travels. There is another memory, too: the time she was kidnapped by a redheaded man who promised to deliver her to her grandmother. The man did not harm her, and she was soon rescued and returned to her mother; however, the incident spurred an obsession in young Alice. Her grandmother, Althea Proserpine, is an author who wrote a single book: Tales from the Hinterland, a collection of dark fairy tales. Although it was a hit, very few copies of the book still exist. Those who have read the book are secretive and fanatical about what lies within. Alice has never met her grandmother; her mother avoids the subject altogether, forbidding Alice to research the topic further.

The bad luck that once followed Alice and her mother seems to have finally come to an end. Alice’s mother is married to a wealthy man and Alice attends an elite prep school in New York. At the café where Alice works, one of the patrons bears an uncanny resemblance to the redheaded man of her past. Later, she returns home to find her mother gone, a single page from Tales of the Hinterland left behind as a clue. With the help of her classmate and Althea Prosperine expert Ellery Finch, Alice begins the quest of finding her mother and uncovering her family’s secrets. Will she find her mother alive? Will she ever meet the elusive Althea Proserpine?

I’ve read very few novels that are able to weave together contemporary and fantasy as well as The Hazel Wood. The fusion of the two genres kept me on my toes, unsure of what to expect. Alice is perhaps one of the best YA narrators I’ve ever read—her observations are laced with sharp sarcasm and a distinct voice. And the descriptions—particularly those at the latter half of the book—are as magical and vivid as any fairy tale.

I had no qualms about The Hazel Wood, only disappointment that the book will not be accessible to all young readers. The vocabulary can be challenging in parts, and I can foresee reluctant or struggling readers throwing in the towel.

Still, this novel will be beloved by teens who are up to the challenge of reading a complex and humorous tale. I believe the world will be raving about The Hazel Wood very soon, so I feel honored to have received an early copy of such a magical book.

5 thoughts on “Book Review: The Hazel Wood

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