Book Review: We Now Return to Regular Life

wenowreturntoregularlife

Wilson, Martin. We Now Return to Regular Life. Dial, 2017.

One of the most chilling books I’ve ever read was Jaycee Dugard’s A Stolen Life. Dugard was abducted as a child, then imprisoned inside the home of her abductor for eighteen years. She was repeatedly sexually assaulted and even bore two children during the time of her captivity. I was in awe of her strength and perseverance.

One thing I didn’t consider, though, was how Jaycee’s reappearance rocked her family and how difficult it must have been to assimilate into her previous life. These are topics that are explored further in Martin Wilson’s YA contemporary fiction novel, We Now Return to Regular Life.

The past three years have been hellish for Beth Walsh as her brother, Sam, went missing on a seemingly innocuous summer afternoon. He told Beth he was going to ride his bike to the mall with his neighbor, Josh, but failed to return home hours later. Despite exhaustive searches on foot, pleas to the public, and false leads, Sam was never located. Beth tries to begin her life anew by joining the soccer team, making new friends, and spending as much time away from home and her grieving mother and stepfather as possible. However, while studying with a friend, Beth receives a phone call she never anticipated: her mother tells her that Sam has returned home. Will he be the same mischievous little brother that Beth remembers? What happened to Sam in his three-year absence?

Josh feels an enormous amount of guilt regarding Sam Walsh’s disappearance. He was with Sam the day he went missing, but abandoned him when the two began arguing. Josh shares all of this with the police, of course, but what eats him inside is the bit of information he keeps secret: as Josh walked back home, alone, he was approached by a strange man in a white truck. The man offered to give Josh a ride home, but Josh fled and hid in a neighbor’s backyard until the man drove away. Josh later decides he was overreacting, and decides to keep the event a secret. But when Sam returns home after three long years, Josh is gutted to learn that the strange man in the truck was Sam’s captor. Will Josh ever come clean to Sam about keeping important information from the police? Will Sam forgive him? Will the boys repair their friendship?

We Now Return to Regular Life has a unique plot, and Beth and Josh’s dual narration gives readers a complete picture of how Sam’s disappearance and reappearance rattles a family and community. The book also discusses masculinity. Many of Sam’s former friends express disbelief that a boy could be abducted and sexually assaulted. Many of the same friends avoid or refuse to speak to Sam, believing that he is a freak or that he somehow enjoyed his kidnapping. These parts of the novel were difficult to read, but I felt they were important and worthy of discussion.

I have only nit-picky complaints regarding the book. I expected the media to have a larger presence in the story—news vans are parked around the house when Sam first returns home and there is one televised interview, but very little coverage is mentioned afterward. Also, the appearance of Beth and Sam’s biological father was much too brief. I desired more exploration of their broken relationship

Overall, Wilson’s novel would be a smart addition to a classroom library. The book explores the ways human beings grow and heal from trauma, which will unfortunately be relatable to a number of students.

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