Book Review: Expelled


Patterson, James, and Emily Raymond. Expelled. JIMMY Patterson Books, Little, Brown, and Company, 2017.

I love a good story, whether that story is found within a book, television show, or movie. In truth, I’d go to the movies every weekend if money were no object. I love documentaries, particularly crime documentaries. Specifically, I am intrigued by the idea of exonerating a wrongly accused individual. So, when I read the synopsis of James Patterson and Emily Raymond’s Expelled, I simply couldn’t resist purchasing the novel.

Theo Foster is having an extremely unfortunate junior year. His ailing father committed suicide, and Theo discovered his body. More recently, Theo has come under fire for an inappropriate photo posted to his Twitter account. The photo shows the drunken school quarterback, a topless female student, and the school mascot urinating on a football jersey. Theo is expelled for this offense, and the photo becomes the talk of the school and community. Theo, however, maintains his innocence, and is completely bewildered by this chain of events. Fearful that expulsion will ruin his entire future, Theo sets out to clear his name and discover who really posted the photo from his account.

Theo bands together with his friend Jude, the school’s mascot who has also been wrongfully accused and expelled. Together, they set out to create a documentary where they’ll interview their peers and get to the bottom of the photo scandal. Theo’s mysterious and alluring classmate, Sasha Ellis, also agrees to help, as she has been wrongfully accused of stealing money from the school’s vending machines. But Theo meets resistance at every turn—from school administrators, from other students at the high school, and from Theo’s own friends. Are those closest to Theo as innocent as they seem? Can Theo prove his own innocence?

As a high school teacher, the details and plot points in Expelled always felt true and unexaggerated. In the age of social media, an unflattering photo or tweet can destroy lives and reputations, ruin chances for scholarships or job opportunities. The novel also touches on serious subjects such as suicide, steroid use, and sexual abuse.

Overall, though, I had a difficult time feeling invested in Expelled. Theo seems to be the only member of the accused interested in clearing his name and—while some of that makes sense later in the novel—he is consistently distracted by his interest in Sasha. His feelings toward her occasionally border on obsession. And the ending seems rushed and much too neat.

Still, Expelled would be a worthy addition to a classroom library. Teachers can also use excerpts from the novel to stress the dangers of reckless social media use. Students who are interested in mysteries will likely find it a satisfying read.