Book Review: Moxie


Mathieu, Jennifer. Moxie. Roaring Brook Press, 2017.

This is an exciting yet challenging time to be a woman. Exciting because of recent developments—the women’s marches in Washington, DC and across the country, and the Me Too and Time’s Up movements. Challenging because, despite everything, we still have a lot of work to do. This is why Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie is an incredibly important book, a must-read for budding young feminists.

Vivian lives in the small Texas town of East Rockport, where football rules all. Pep rallies are a frequent occurrence, local businesses shut down during home games, and football players have free reign over the school. It doesn’t help that the star of the football team, Mitchell Wilson, happens to the son of the school’s principal. He barks at his female classmates to make him a sandwich and plays a game known as “bump n’ grab” where he fondles girls in the hallway. This coupled with dress code checks that target female students specifically has pushed Vivian to take action.

Inspired by her mother’s past as a member of the punk rock scene and a frequent protestor, Vivan creates a zine known as Moxie, a call to arms aimed at other fed up girls attending East Rockport High. She leaves the zines anonymously in the girls’ bathrooms, and it has a small ripple effect throughout the student body. Subsequent issues follow—Moxie encourages girls to show up in a bath robe to combat dress code checks and slather players of the “bump n’ grab” game with offensive stickers. Other girls, inspired by Moxie, hold bake sales and arts and crafts shows. But, as Moxie’s influence spreads, the administration cracks down: eventually, any school activities under the sponsorship of Moxie are strictly forbidden. Will the administration trace Moxie back to Vivian? Will Vivian ever change the sexist culture of East Rockport High?

This book is equal parts entertaining and rage inducing. There were moments that I felt such anger toward the archaic policies at East Rockport High that I found myself grinding my teeth. Mathieu also does a fantastic job with characterization, particularly with Vivian and her boyfriend, Seth. Seth is a complicated character, a “good guy” who doesn’t understand Vivian’s anger and continually tries to reassure her that not all guys are the same. This is great commentary, a reminder that everyone can grow and change.

On the flip side, Moxie pushes the boundaries of believability. Some of the actions of the administrators and teachers, specifically, were so outrageous that it was difficult to imagine that they’d be allowed in the most closed minded of communities. And all of Vivian’s teachers are the same—checked out, disinterested, etc. I found it hard to believe that in an entire high school there was not a single caring adult who was aghast at the behavior of the male students.

Still, for classes studying gender issues, you’ll find few books better suited for class discussion than Moxie. The novel challenges feminist stereotypes—a character in the novel, for example, believes she cannot be a feminist because she is a cheerleader. Moxie would also be a great catalyst to promote positive change in our schools and communities.