Book Review: The Upworld

image1 (5)

Frantz, Lindsey S. The Upworld. Line by Lion Publications, 2017. Print.

Appalachia is my home, but depictions of the area in movies and books haven’t always been kind.

In recent years, I’ve been happy to see a surge of writing that celebrates Appalachia by acknowledging its flaws but also highlighting its beauty, knack for storytelling, and strong community ties. That’s why I was excited to begin reading Lindsey Frantz’s debut YA novel The Upworld, set entirely in Kentucky.

In a dystopian future, Appalachia has been divided into three distinct factions: those who dwell above ground in communities, those who dwell in caves below ground, and the Wylden, dangerous savages who travel in packs. Erilyn spent her early life below ground until a shameful accident wrought by her telekinetic abilities forced her to move “up world”. There, she met and befriended a woman named Rosemarie who taught her to forage and live off the land. After Rosemarie’s death, Erilyn lives alone in a pine tree with only her large feral cat, Luna, for company. Everything changes when a boy from one of the communities, Finn, runs into the forest, pursued by Wylden.

After assisting Finn via her supernatural abilities, Erilyn nurses him back to health. The two develop feelings for one another, but as Winter looms closer, Erilyn knows that she cannot forage enough food to sustain two people. She convinces Finn to return to his community of Sunnybrook, but Finn refuses unless she accompanies him. It’s been so long since Erilyn was around others—will she adjust? Will the citizens of Sunnybrook discover her abilities? Does Finn’s ex, Morrigan, have it out for Erilyn? Is the mayor of Sunnybrook, Cillian, as innocent and friendly as he seems? And will Erilyn ever face the damage she caused below ground?

Frantz masterfully builds tension and suspense in The Upworld. Whether Erilyn, Finn, Luna, and company are running from Wylden, fighting their way out of Sunnybrook, or crawling through underground caverns, a sense of urgency is continuously present. Erilyn’s abilities are plainly stated and readers can easily put themselves in her shoes. The characters are multi-faceted—like Erilyn, we aren’t entirely sure who to trust. And the cover is beautiful—this is certainly a book you’ll want to display on your bookshelf and photograph for Instagram.

I desired more spark between Finn and Erilyn, perhaps more scenes of them growing together during their time alone in the forest. I also didn’t care for the nickname “Eri”—but I’m never a fan of shortening a main character’s name.

This novel would be a perfect addition to a dystopian unit. I’m using the prologue of this story (found in this anthology) with my classes this school year. Students who are fans of The Hunger Games and other books featuring powerful female protagonists will certainly be enthralled with both Erilyn and The Upworld.

Book Review: From Now On

from now on cover

Chopchinski, Zachary, Cathi Desurne, Lindsey S. Frantz, Nealy Gihan, C.D. Scott, Lichelle Slater, Christina Walker, Katy Walker, and KT Webb. From Now On: The Last Words Anthology. N.p.: n.p., 2017. Print.

I noticed an interesting trend during last year’s presidential election—no matter their political leanings, my students became acutely aware of their government, its flaws and positive attributes alike. This awareness made it a particularly interesting time to teach dystopian literature. Though we delved into a few short stories by authors like Kurt Vonnegut and Stephen Vincent Benet, students spent the bulk of their time reading novels. I assumed that this was typical in the dystopian realm—the amount of world building required by the genre just couldn’t be contained within the boundaries of a short story.

This is why I was particularly excited to read From Now On: The Last Words Anthology. It was described as a collection of dystopian short stories, many with young adult protagonists. Each story closed with the same line: “From now on, I’ll save myself.” Below is a synopsis of each piece in the collection.

When the Body Parts Hit the Fan by Zachary Chopchinski: A wise-cracking protagonist named Guy tries to maneuver through Maine post-apocalypse; however, his progress is impeded by murderous shadow creatures who tear passerby limb from limb. Guy knows there is only one way to receive salvation—he must stay in the light.

The Pack by Cathi Desurne: At only seventeen, Grace is a feared and respected member of The Pack, a group of revolutionaries who adhere to a wolf hierarchy. However, Grace has suspicions that the group is being followed and watched. This feeling of uneasiness is coupled with confusion when Grace begins to have romantic feelings for a fellow member of The Pack, Ryder.

Erilyn’s Awakening by Lindsey S. Frantz: Erilyn is not like her peers—she has darker hair, eyes, and supernatural abilities that appear in times of duress. An orphan who lives below ground, Erilyn has no true friends or companions other than a solitary jar of glow worms. While gathering food and plants, Erilyn is tormented by the other children in her party and makes the decision to travel “upworld”.

Something Old by Nealy Gihan: Hope lives in a world ruled by gemstones—those who have all gemstones in their genetic makeup are deemed most desirable. Hope has only two, but a proposal from a wealthy member of the reigning race gives Hope the opportunity to move above her station. Slowly, Hope learns that life among the elite is not as she dreamed it would be.

The Wall by C.D. Scott: Treece attempts to flee her negligent father on the morning of her sister’s wedding. Unbeknownst to her father or sister, Treece is in love with a man “beyond the wall”. She dreams of traveling to his homeland and starting a new life, but will it be possible?

Shadow of Heritage by Lichelle Slater: After the release of an environment-altering bomb, all citizens of the United States have some degree of supernatural ability. While Corvits’ father is a supervillain, he has the rather tame power of bringing artwork to life. When he is given additional information about his mother’s murder, however, he realizes that he might have a dark side after all.

The Weeding by Christina Walker: Nina believes she lives in the perfect society with true equality among citizens. However, when the leaders of the government announce plans for a “weeding”, Nina feels uneasy. Her worst fears are realized when the elderly and disabled are forcibly removed from their homes. Can she reach her arthritic friend Scott before it’s too late?

Mirrors by Katy Walker: Allan has a miserable life. Divorced and unemployed, he spends most of his time playing video games until a weird moment with his bathroom mirror changes his life forever.

Side Effects of Progress by KT Webb: Nick is a hardworking scientist who dreams of creating the perfect vaccine to guard against illness. Unfortunately, his manipulative boss has other plans, and Nick must work around-the-clock to save his co-workers and possibly humanity itself.

Each piece in this anthology has a different narrative voice and unveils a crumbling society in a unique way. As with most short story collections, some pieces are stronger than others: Frantz’s Erilyn’s Awakening, for example, has vivid imagery and great moments of suspense—I felt my heart rate increase as Erilyn navigated her way through an underground cavern while being pursued by other children. Scott’s The Wall had a nice plot twist that made me crave an entire novel of Treece’s adventures. Gihan’s Something Old contained both a unique premise and a theme of female suppression reminiscent of The Handmaid’s Tale.

I did find a few grammatical errors during my read and, as I downloaded the anthology as an e-book, there were some noticeable formatting issues while reading on both my tablet and phone.

Overall, teachers who are focusing on dystopian literature would be wise to purchase and download From Now On: The Last Words Anthology. There are stories that pair well with many of the main dystopian characteristics: figurehead worship (Walker’s The Weeding), fear of the outside world (Frantz’s Erilyn’s Awakening), restriction of freedom (Webb’s Side Effects of Progress) just to name a few. In a market saturated with dystopian novels and movies, these are fresh, inventive short stories that will hold your students’ interest and challenge their imagination.