Book Review: Girl Online

girl online cover

Sugg, Zoe. Girl Online. Keywords Press, Atria. 2014.

As an adult, I like to pretend that I was never an awkward pre-teen or teenager. The proof is inescapable, however. My mother recently found an old photo from a glamour shot session–sequined blazer, big hair, and too much rouge.

So, in short, I know a little something about being awkward.

That’s why I found the synopsis of Zoe Sugg’s Girl Online appealing. The protagonist is clumsy, unsure, and very relatable.

Fifteen-year-old Penny Porter seems to continually find new ways to embarrass herself, whether it’s falling in a pothole, knocking over a display, or inadvertently telling the boy she likes that she has fleas. And there’s an alarming new development in Penny’s life–following a serious car accident, Penny has panic attacks. Her only moments of true peace and security come from being with her family, best friend Elliot, and sharing her thoughts in a blog entitled Girl Online. Despite her lackluster popularity in the “real world”, Penny has a slew of readers who encourage and uplift her.

After a particularly painful incident at Penny’s school, her parents make an announcement–they will be traveling abroad to New York City to help coordinate a wedding at the Waldorf Astoria and they want Penny and Elliot to come along. The distance and glamour of New York are just what Penny needs to heal from her embarrassment. While helping her mother with wedding preparations, Penny meets Noah, the grandson of the wedding’s caterer. With his dimples, Brooklyn accent, and ability to calm her when she is anxious, Penny begins falling for Noah almost immediately. But she knows that soon she will have to return home to the UK. Will she and Noah be able to maintain a long-distance relationship? Why does Noah rarely go out in public? And as the popularity of Girl Online grows, will Penny be able to keep her identity a secret?

There were great little details and moments of humor that endeared this book to me–Sugg’s descriptions of New York at Christmastime, the contrast between UK and America, and Penny’s tendency to say the wrong thing in times of duress. Although relationships in YA romances sometimes feel forced, Noah and Penny’s chemistry was palpable and believable. Blog posts and text messages are interspersed throughout the chapters, and they provide a nice break from the narration. Overall, Girl Online is a quick, enjoyable read.

I felt the immense popularity of Penny’s blog was somewhat far-fetched; the insertion of more blog posts would have possibly helped the reader see what made it attractive to so many readers. And Megan, Penny’s “frienemy”, was so thoroughly evil that she felt flat.

This will be a beloved addition to a classroom library–not only is it a high interest text, but the author, Zoella, is a popular vlogger on YouTube. More importantly, this book could possibly provide comfort to students struggling with their own anxiety. Girl Online is a nice reminder that the teenage years can be awkward, but they can be amazing, too.

Book Review: Little & Lion

little and lion cover

Colbert, Brandy. Little & Lion. Little Brown, 2017.

As a high school teacher and avid reader, I’ve become familiar with the continuously growing roster of popular YA authors. It’s rare—and therefore extremely exciting—for me to come across an unfamiliar author. While reading the YA anthology Summer Days and Summer Nights, I saw many names and writing styles I knew—Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Lev Grossman. But my favorite story came from an author I’d never read: Brandy Colbert. I went to Amazon and quickly purchased her latest novel, Little & Lion.

Suzette is a proud member of a diverse, blended family: she’s close to her stepfather, Saul, and stepbrother Lionel. She and her mother even convert to Judaism, though, as an African-American, Suzette must deal with her share of insensitive questions. She and Lionel (nicknamed “Little” and “Lion” respectively) share a unique bond, one that is tested when Lion has a strange, violent outburst. Lion is diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and while he struggles and tries a myriad of medications, Suzette’s parents worry that she is too preoccupied with her brother’s health. They send her away to boarding school in Massachusetts.

When Suzette returns home for the summer, many things have changed—her brother appears to be in better health, while she is reeling following an abrupt, messy breakup with her roommate, Iris. Suzette lands a part-time job at a florist where she feels a pull toward her tattooed, spunky co-worker, Rafaela. But when Lion meets and expresses an interest in Rafaela, Suzette feels conflicted. This is further complicated by a secret Lion shares with Suzette alone: he is shirking his medication. Will Suzette find the courage to tell their parents? Will Lion function without the assistance of his medication? Will Suzette stay with her family in LA or return to the boarding school in the Fall?

Little & Lion inspires the reader to think about family—how they come in many shapes and sizes, and how the family we choose often means more to us than a biological connection. It also highlights the helplessness a family member feels when someone they love struggles with mental illness. Suzette, too, is a fantastic protagonist. Her feelings of devotion and concern are often at odds with her feelings of jealousy and resentment, which makes her relatable and human.

I struggled with the characterization of Rafaela—I couldn’t decide if she was bold and unpredictable or just a troublemaker. Some of her actions seemed rash and unkind and caused me to dislike her almost immediately.

I could certainly see using passages from Little & Lion to springboard conversations about mental illness or blended families. The book would likely be a popular and relevant choice in a classroom library. I can’t wait to read more of Colbert’s work—her clear, honest writing style will be attractive to both teenage and adult readers.

Book Review: Turtles All the Way Down

turtles all the way down cover

Green, John. Turtles All The Way Down. Dutton Books, 2017.

To say I am a fan of John Green would be a tremendous understatement. Not only are his books fantastic and popular with my students and co-workers, his Crash Course videos make frequent appearances in my instruction. I am a proud Nerdfigher and have attended two conferences spearheaded by the Green Brothers—VidCon and NerdCon Stories. There’s a Nerdfighter flag draped across the wall of my classroom, a Nerdfighter enamel pin affixed to my tote bag. I like to hear John’s views on everything from politics and religion to whether pineapple belongs on pizza.

So, like other YA fans, I was aflutter with excitement when John announced his forthcoming novel, Turtles All The Way Down. I pre-ordered an autographed copy and waited with bated breath.

I can happily report that Turtles All The Way Down was certainly worth the wait.

Aza Holmes lives with debilitating anxiety, worrying endlessly about bacteria and contagious diseases. It’s a fear that has resulted in a variety of rituals—Aza habitually presses her thumbnail into her middle finger, creating a callus that she must continually douse with hand sanitizer and rebandage. Thoughts of microbes and fatal bacteria often cause her thoughts to spiral, and she’s rarely mentally present when spending time with her mom or best friend, Daisy.

It is during one of these obsessive thought spirals that Aza hears about the disappearance of Russell Pickett, a billionaire on the lam. Russell’s son, Davis, was one of Aza’s childhood friends. After some brash encouragement from Daisy, Aza seeks out Davis, and the two reconnect. As Aza and Daisy piece together scant clues from Russell’s disappearance, Aza struggles with her feelings for Davis and the constant, nagging presence of her phobias. Will she learn to regularly take her medication? Will her mental illness interfere with her burgeoning relationship? Will anyone uncover Russell Pickett’s location?

I’d sorely missed John Green’s writing style, and starting Turtles All The Way Down was a breath of fresh air. The language is smart, the characters varied and complicated. There were great moments of humor and the painful scenes were genuine and raw. John Green does a fantastic job writing Aza’s obsessive thoughts, allowing the text to tighten on the reader in the same way that Aza’s fears close around her. Aza’s relationships—both romantic and platonic—are refreshingly real. There are no neat happily-ever-afters, making this an accurate depiction of mental illness.

There is little to dislike in Green’s newest novel. The number of conflicts and plot points can almost feel overwhelming, but this perhaps speaks to Aza’s mental state.

Like all of Green’s novels, Turtles All The Way Down will be an essential addition to a high school classroom library. Students who are dealing with anxiety or loss will find it especially relatable. Overall, Turtles All The Way Down is a fantastic read from an author who contributes a great deal to teenagers, educators, and the world at large. What’s not to love?